{"id":1010600935539,"title":"Chanterelle Wild Mushrooms Powder - Wildharvested - 1 oz.","handle":"chanterelle-wild-mushrooms-powder-wildharvested-1-oz","description":"Freshest Dried Mushrooms In USA!\nShipped In Flavor Savor Bags!\nPacked Fresh To Order At Florida Herb House!\n\nYou will get about 10 one teaspoon servings out of one ounce of our gourmet chanterelle mushroom powder. Use a teaspoon in any mushroom sauce or mushroom gravy recipe to make the flavor jump out of the pot!\n\nChanterelles seem to be worth their weight in gold. They are golden looking, golden tasting, and golden priced. The cap is fleshy, with wavy, rounded cap margins tapering downward to meet the stem. The gills are not the usual thin straight panels hanging from the lower surface of the cap, as we see in the common store mushroom. Instead, the ridges are rounded, blunt, shallow, and widely spaced. At the edge of the cap they are forked and interconnected. \n\n\nThis pleasantly aromatic fleshy wild mushroom shines like an exotic golden flower when seen from a distance against the drab autumn forest background. Also known as \"golden chanterelle\" and \"egg mushroom,\" it has a magical appeal for most culinary experts in Europe, United States, and Asia. But all chanterelles are not alike. European and Asian forms are usually about the size of a thumb. In the eastern United States they are the size of a fist. But, ah, in the west they can be as large as two hand spans--from little finger to little finger. Chanterelles weighing as much as two pounds are not uncommon.\n\n\n\nChanterelles seem to be worth their weight in gold. They are golden looking, golden tasting, and golden priced. The cap is fleshy, with wavy, rounded cap margins tapering downward to meet the stem. The gills are not the usual thin straight panels hanging from the lower surface of the cap, as we see in the common store mushroom. Instead, the ridges are rounded, blunt, shallow, and widely spaced. At the edge of the cap they are forked and interconnected. The chanterelle's aroma is variously described as apricot- or peachlike. It is unmistakably different and identifiable.\n\nChanterelles will reappear in the same places year after year if carefully harvested so as not to disturb the ground in which the mycelium (the vegetative part of the mushroom) grows. There are yearly variations--some years more mushrooms, some less. They fruit from September to February on the West Coast and almost all summer in the east, sometimes coming up in several flushes. We think of them as promiscuous in their plant relationships, because we have found their mycelial threads intertwined with the roots of hardwood trees, conifers, shrubs, and bushes. They enjoy deep, old leaf litter. Chanterelles are seldom invaded by insects. And forest animals do not share our interest in them as food.\n\n\n\nCooking - them into hunks of a generous size, so that the maximum amount of flavor can be appreciated. Chanterelles are meaty and chewy. One of the best ways to cook them is to slice and sauté them in butter. Cream or half and half and chicken broth are good additions. Chanterelles bake well and retain their flavor after long cooking. Eggs, chicken, pork, and veal harmonize beautifully with them.\n\nAfter trying many recipes, we still prefer to cook chanterelles by baking them for 20 minutes in chicken broth with coarsely chopped onions. Serve this over rice or pasta. Potatoes will overpower the chanterelle flavor, as will many other vegetables.\n\nVery few people eat chanterelles raw. They are peppery and upsetting, and they can make some people ill. In any case, their finest flavor can only be appreciated when they are thoroughly cooked.\n\nPreserving - Freeze Chanterelles after sautéing with butter and onions. When defrosted, they will retain most of their flavor. Dried chanterelles lose flavor and the texture of the slices becomes rubbery. A chef recently suggested that dried chanterelles reconstituted in water overnight retain more flavor if the soaking water is included when they are cooked.\n\nTo can chanterelles, clean them thouroughly and cut them in big chunks and steam for 20 minutes. Place the pieces in small canning jars and cover them with the liquid from the steaming vessel or boiling water to make up the difference. Add 1\/2 teaspoon salt and 1\/2 teaspoon vinegar. Finally, sterilize them for 40 minutes in a pressure cooker at 10 pounds pressure.\n\n\nChanterelles can be pickled with various spices and flavorings in vinegar, oil, soy sauce, etc.. They will keep for a week in the refrigerator.\nBelow You Will Find A Couple Of Our Favorite Chanterelle Recipes!\n\nMarinated Chanterelles - Serves 8 as an appetizer\n\nPaul is a well-known Berkeley chef. He recommends that these marinated chanterelles be eaten as appetizers or be heated and drained to serve over pasta.\n\n1 cup peanut oil or light olive oil \n1\/4 pound dried chanterelles, cut into slices (make sure they are dried--waterlogged mushrooms won't work) \nMarinade: \n1\/4 cup fine wine vinegar, balsamic or fruit vinegar \n1 garlic clove, sliced thin \n1 bay leaf \n1 teaspoon Dijon mustard \nPinch of fresh herbs (tarragon, savory, oregano, or marjoram) \n1\/4 teaspoon salt \n \nIn a sauté pan or skillet, heat the oil until it becomes very hot, then add the chanterelles. Toss them in the pan quickly for 3 to 5 minutes. Combine all the marinade ingredients. Add the chanterelles and the oil from the pan. Marinate the mushrooms for at least 4 hours in the refrigerator. This will keep for 2 weeks in the refrigerator.\n\n\nChanterelle Mushrooms And Bacon Delight!\nINGREDIENTS (Nutrition)\n2 teaspoons olive oil \n2 tablespoons minced shallots \n1 clove garlic, minced \n1 cup dried chanterelle mushrooms, finely chopped \n1 tablespoon brandy \n1\/2 teaspoon minced fresh thyme \n1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley \n1\/4 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste \n1 egg \n1\/4 cup milk \n1\/4 cup shredded Swiss cheese \n2 tablespoons cream cheese, softened \n2 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled \n24 mini phyllo tart shells \n\nDIRECTIONS\nPreheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Saute shallots until they begin to brown. Add garlic and mushrooms, and cook until tender. Deglaze pan with brandy, and season with thyme, parsley, salt, and pepper. Remove from heat, and allow to cool. \nIn a large bowl, combine egg, milk, Swiss cheese, cream cheese, and bacon. Fold in mushroom mixture. Spoon evenly into phyllo cups, and place cups on baking sheet. \nBake in preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until filling is set. \n\nTags:\nchanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle recipes\nchanterelle mushroom recipes\nchanterelle mushroom\nchanterelle mushroom identification\nchanterelle nyc\nchanterelle mushrooms recipes\nbuy chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle recipe\nidentifying chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom soup\nchanterelle mushrooms washington\nchanterelle soup\nfalse chanterelle\nchanterelle restaurant\ndried chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle identification\nchanterelle risotto\nchanterelle mushroom recipe\nchanterelle sacramento\ncooking chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom hunting\ngolden chanterelle\nchanterelle spores\nwhite chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushrooms identification\nchanterelle bras\ngrowing chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle season\nchanterelle pasta recipes\nchanterelle pasta\nchanterelle sauce\nmushrooms chanterelle\nchanterelle soup recipes\nchanterelle photography\nwhite chanterelle\nchanterelle mushroom season\nwild chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom spores\nchanterelle banjo\nblack chanterelle\nchanterelle new york\nchanterelle mushroom sauce\nchanterelle hunting\nchanterelle mushrooms oregon\nmushroom chanterelle\nbuy chanterelle\ngrow chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom buyers\ncleaning chanterelle mushrooms\n\n","published_at":"2018-06-18T12:25:16-04:00","created_at":"2018-06-18T12:25:17-04:00","vendor":"vendor-unknown","type":"All","tags":[],"price":799,"price_min":799,"price_max":799,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":10708782186611,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"713","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Chanterelle Wild Mushrooms Powder - Wildharvested - 1 oz.","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":799,"weight":91,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/chantrelle.jpg?v=1533740420"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/chantrelle.jpg?v=1533740420","options":["Title"],"content":"Freshest Dried Mushrooms In USA!\nShipped In Flavor Savor Bags!\nPacked Fresh To Order At Florida Herb House!\n\nYou will get about 10 one teaspoon servings out of one ounce of our gourmet chanterelle mushroom powder. Use a teaspoon in any mushroom sauce or mushroom gravy recipe to make the flavor jump out of the pot!\n\nChanterelles seem to be worth their weight in gold. They are golden looking, golden tasting, and golden priced. The cap is fleshy, with wavy, rounded cap margins tapering downward to meet the stem. The gills are not the usual thin straight panels hanging from the lower surface of the cap, as we see in the common store mushroom. Instead, the ridges are rounded, blunt, shallow, and widely spaced. At the edge of the cap they are forked and interconnected. \n\n\nThis pleasantly aromatic fleshy wild mushroom shines like an exotic golden flower when seen from a distance against the drab autumn forest background. Also known as \"golden chanterelle\" and \"egg mushroom,\" it has a magical appeal for most culinary experts in Europe, United States, and Asia. But all chanterelles are not alike. European and Asian forms are usually about the size of a thumb. In the eastern United States they are the size of a fist. But, ah, in the west they can be as large as two hand spans--from little finger to little finger. Chanterelles weighing as much as two pounds are not uncommon.\n\n\n\nChanterelles seem to be worth their weight in gold. They are golden looking, golden tasting, and golden priced. The cap is fleshy, with wavy, rounded cap margins tapering downward to meet the stem. The gills are not the usual thin straight panels hanging from the lower surface of the cap, as we see in the common store mushroom. Instead, the ridges are rounded, blunt, shallow, and widely spaced. At the edge of the cap they are forked and interconnected. The chanterelle's aroma is variously described as apricot- or peachlike. It is unmistakably different and identifiable.\n\nChanterelles will reappear in the same places year after year if carefully harvested so as not to disturb the ground in which the mycelium (the vegetative part of the mushroom) grows. There are yearly variations--some years more mushrooms, some less. They fruit from September to February on the West Coast and almost all summer in the east, sometimes coming up in several flushes. We think of them as promiscuous in their plant relationships, because we have found their mycelial threads intertwined with the roots of hardwood trees, conifers, shrubs, and bushes. They enjoy deep, old leaf litter. Chanterelles are seldom invaded by insects. And forest animals do not share our interest in them as food.\n\n\n\nCooking - them into hunks of a generous size, so that the maximum amount of flavor can be appreciated. Chanterelles are meaty and chewy. One of the best ways to cook them is to slice and sauté them in butter. Cream or half and half and chicken broth are good additions. Chanterelles bake well and retain their flavor after long cooking. Eggs, chicken, pork, and veal harmonize beautifully with them.\n\nAfter trying many recipes, we still prefer to cook chanterelles by baking them for 20 minutes in chicken broth with coarsely chopped onions. Serve this over rice or pasta. Potatoes will overpower the chanterelle flavor, as will many other vegetables.\n\nVery few people eat chanterelles raw. They are peppery and upsetting, and they can make some people ill. In any case, their finest flavor can only be appreciated when they are thoroughly cooked.\n\nPreserving - Freeze Chanterelles after sautéing with butter and onions. When defrosted, they will retain most of their flavor. Dried chanterelles lose flavor and the texture of the slices becomes rubbery. A chef recently suggested that dried chanterelles reconstituted in water overnight retain more flavor if the soaking water is included when they are cooked.\n\nTo can chanterelles, clean them thouroughly and cut them in big chunks and steam for 20 minutes. Place the pieces in small canning jars and cover them with the liquid from the steaming vessel or boiling water to make up the difference. Add 1\/2 teaspoon salt and 1\/2 teaspoon vinegar. Finally, sterilize them for 40 minutes in a pressure cooker at 10 pounds pressure.\n\n\nChanterelles can be pickled with various spices and flavorings in vinegar, oil, soy sauce, etc.. They will keep for a week in the refrigerator.\nBelow You Will Find A Couple Of Our Favorite Chanterelle Recipes!\n\nMarinated Chanterelles - Serves 8 as an appetizer\n\nPaul is a well-known Berkeley chef. He recommends that these marinated chanterelles be eaten as appetizers or be heated and drained to serve over pasta.\n\n1 cup peanut oil or light olive oil \n1\/4 pound dried chanterelles, cut into slices (make sure they are dried--waterlogged mushrooms won't work) \nMarinade: \n1\/4 cup fine wine vinegar, balsamic or fruit vinegar \n1 garlic clove, sliced thin \n1 bay leaf \n1 teaspoon Dijon mustard \nPinch of fresh herbs (tarragon, savory, oregano, or marjoram) \n1\/4 teaspoon salt \n \nIn a sauté pan or skillet, heat the oil until it becomes very hot, then add the chanterelles. Toss them in the pan quickly for 3 to 5 minutes. Combine all the marinade ingredients. Add the chanterelles and the oil from the pan. Marinate the mushrooms for at least 4 hours in the refrigerator. This will keep for 2 weeks in the refrigerator.\n\n\nChanterelle Mushrooms And Bacon Delight!\nINGREDIENTS (Nutrition)\n2 teaspoons olive oil \n2 tablespoons minced shallots \n1 clove garlic, minced \n1 cup dried chanterelle mushrooms, finely chopped \n1 tablespoon brandy \n1\/2 teaspoon minced fresh thyme \n1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley \n1\/4 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste \n1 egg \n1\/4 cup milk \n1\/4 cup shredded Swiss cheese \n2 tablespoons cream cheese, softened \n2 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled \n24 mini phyllo tart shells \n\nDIRECTIONS\nPreheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Saute shallots until they begin to brown. Add garlic and mushrooms, and cook until tender. Deglaze pan with brandy, and season with thyme, parsley, salt, and pepper. Remove from heat, and allow to cool. \nIn a large bowl, combine egg, milk, Swiss cheese, cream cheese, and bacon. Fold in mushroom mixture. Spoon evenly into phyllo cups, and place cups on baking sheet. \nBake in preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until filling is set. \n\nTags:\nchanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle recipes\nchanterelle mushroom recipes\nchanterelle mushroom\nchanterelle mushroom identification\nchanterelle nyc\nchanterelle mushrooms recipes\nbuy chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle recipe\nidentifying chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom soup\nchanterelle mushrooms washington\nchanterelle soup\nfalse chanterelle\nchanterelle restaurant\ndried chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle identification\nchanterelle risotto\nchanterelle mushroom recipe\nchanterelle sacramento\ncooking chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom hunting\ngolden chanterelle\nchanterelle spores\nwhite chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushrooms identification\nchanterelle bras\ngrowing chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle season\nchanterelle pasta recipes\nchanterelle pasta\nchanterelle sauce\nmushrooms chanterelle\nchanterelle soup recipes\nchanterelle photography\nwhite chanterelle\nchanterelle mushroom season\nwild chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom spores\nchanterelle banjo\nblack chanterelle\nchanterelle new york\nchanterelle mushroom sauce\nchanterelle hunting\nchanterelle mushrooms oregon\nmushroom chanterelle\nbuy chanterelle\ngrow chanterelle mushrooms\nchanterelle mushroom buyers\ncleaning chanterelle mushrooms\n\n"}

Chanterelle Wild Mushrooms Powder - Wildharvested - 1 oz.

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Freshest Dried Mushrooms In USA! Shipped In Flavor Savor Bags! Packed Fresh To Order At Florida Herb House! You will get about 10 one teaspoon servings out of one ounce of our gourmet chanterelle mushroom powder. Use a teaspoon in any mushroom sauce or mushroom gravy recipe to make the flavor jump out of the pot! Chanterelles seem to be worth their weight in gold. They are golden looking, golden tasting, and golden priced. The cap is fleshy, with wavy, rounded cap margins tapering downward to meet the stem. The gills are not the usual thin straight panels hanging from the lower surface of the cap, as we see in the common store mushroom. Instead, the ridges are rounded, blunt, shallow, and widely spaced. At the edge of the cap they are forked and interconnected. This pleasantly aromatic fleshy wild mushroom shines like an exotic golden flower when seen from a distance against the drab autumn forest background. Also known as "golden chanterelle" and "egg mushroom," it has a magical appeal for most culinary experts in Europe, United States, and Asia. But all chanterelles are not alike. European and Asian forms are usually about the size of a thumb. In the eastern United States they are the size of a fist. But, ah, in the west they can be as large as two hand spans--from little finger to little finger. Chanterelles weighing as much as two pounds are not uncommon. Chanterelles seem to be worth their weight in gold. They are golden looking, golden tasting, and golden priced. The cap is fleshy, with wavy, rounded cap margins tapering downward to meet the stem. The gills are not the usual thin straight panels hanging from the lower surface of the cap, as we see in the common store mushroom. Instead, the ridges are rounded, blunt, shallow, and widely spaced. At the edge of the cap they are forked and interconnected. The chanterelle's aroma is variously described as apricot- or peachlike. It is unmistakably different and identifiable. Chanterelles will reappear in the same places year after year if carefully harvested so as not to disturb the ground in which the mycelium (the vegetative part of the mushroom) grows. There are yearly variations--some years more mushrooms, some less. They fruit from September to February on the West Coast and almost all summer in the east, sometimes coming up in several flushes. We think of them as promiscuous in their plant relationships, because we have found their mycelial threads intertwined with the roots of hardwood trees, conifers, shrubs, and bushes. They enjoy deep, old leaf litter. Chanterelles are seldom invaded by insects. And forest animals do not share our interest in them as food. Cooking - them into hunks of a generous size, so that the maximum amount of flavor can be appreciated. Chanterelles are meaty and chewy. One of the best ways to cook them is to slice and sauté them in butter. Cream or half and half and chicken broth are good additions. Chanterelles bake well and retain their flavor after long cooking. Eggs, chicken, pork, and veal harmonize beautifully with them. After trying many recipes, we still prefer to cook chanterelles by baking them for 20 minutes in chicken broth with coarsely chopped onions. Serve this over rice or pasta. Potatoes will overpower the chanterelle flavor, as will many other vegetables. Very few people eat chanterelles raw. They are peppery and upsetting, and they can make some people ill. In any case, their finest flavor can only be appreciated when they are thoroughly cooked. Preserving - Freeze Chanterelles after sautéing with butter and onions. When defrosted, they will retain most of their flavor. Dried chanterelles lose flavor and the texture of the slices becomes rubbery. A chef recently suggested that dried chanterelles reconstituted in water overnight retain more flavor if the soaking water is included when they are cooked. To can chanterelles, clean them thouroughly and cut them in big chunks and steam for 20 minutes. Place the pieces in small canning jars and cover them with the liquid from the steaming vessel or boiling water to make up the difference. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon vinegar. Finally, sterilize them for 40 minutes in a pressure cooker at 10 pounds pressure. Chanterelles can be pickled with various spices and flavorings in vinegar, oil, soy sauce, etc.. They will keep for a week in the refrigerator. Below You Will Find A Couple Of Our Favorite Chanterelle Recipes! Marinated Chanterelles - Serves 8 as an appetizer Paul is a well-known Berkeley chef. He recommends that these marinated chanterelles be eaten as appetizers or be heated and drained to serve over pasta. 1 cup peanut oil or light olive oil 1/4 pound dried chanterelles, cut into slices (make sure they are dried--waterlogged mushrooms won't work) Marinade: 1/4 cup fine wine vinegar, balsamic or fruit vinegar 1 garlic clove, sliced thin 1 bay leaf 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard Pinch of fresh herbs (tarragon, savory, oregano, or marjoram) 1/4 teaspoon salt In a sauté pan or skillet, heat the oil until it becomes very hot, then add the chanterelles. Toss them in the pan quickly for 3 to 5 minutes. Combine all the marinade ingredients. Add the chanterelles and the oil from the pan. Marinate the mushrooms for at least 4 hours in the refrigerator. This will keep for 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Chanterelle Mushrooms And Bacon Delight! INGREDIENTS (Nutrition) 2 teaspoons olive oil 2 tablespoons minced shallots 1 clove garlic, minced 1 cup dried chanterelle mushrooms, finely chopped 1 tablespoon brandy 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh thyme 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste 1 egg 1/4 cup milk 1/4 cup shredded Swiss cheese 2 tablespoons cream cheese, softened 2 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled 24 mini phyllo tart shells DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Saute shallots until they begin to brown. Add garlic and mushrooms, and cook until tender. Deglaze pan with brandy, and season with thyme, parsley, salt, and pepper. Remove from heat, and allow to cool. In a large bowl, combine egg, milk, Swiss cheese, cream cheese, and bacon. Fold in mushroom mixture. Spoon evenly into phyllo cups, and place cups on baking sheet. Bake in preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until filling is set. Tags: chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle recipes chanterelle mushroom recipes chanterelle mushroom chanterelle mushroom identification chanterelle nyc chanterelle mushrooms recipes buy chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle recipe identifying chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle mushroom soup chanterelle mushrooms washington chanterelle soup false chanterelle chanterelle restaurant dried chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle identification chanterelle risotto chanterelle mushroom recipe chanterelle sacramento cooking chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle mushroom hunting golden chanterelle chanterelle spores white chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle mushrooms identification chanterelle bras growing chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle season chanterelle pasta recipes chanterelle pasta chanterelle sauce mushrooms chanterelle chanterelle soup recipes chanterelle photography white chanterelle chanterelle mushroom season wild chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle mushroom spores chanterelle banjo black chanterelle chanterelle new york chanterelle mushroom sauce chanterelle hunting chanterelle mushrooms oregon mushroom chanterelle buy chanterelle grow chanterelle mushrooms chanterelle mushroom buyers cleaning chanterelle mushrooms