{"id":1010615648371,"title":"Frankincense Resin- Wild Harvested","handle":"frankincense-resin-wild-harvested","description":" Derived from tree sap, or gum resin, both frankincense and myrrh are prized for their alluring fragrance. Frankincense is a milky white resin extracted from species of the genus Boswellia, which thrive in arid, cool areas of the Arabian Peninsula, East Africa and India. The finest and most aromatic of this species is Boswellia sacra, a small tree that grows in Somalia, Oman and Yemen. These plants, which grow to a height of 16 feet (5 meters), have papery bark, sparse bunches of paired leaves, and flowers with white petals and a yellow or red center. Myrrh is a reddish resin that comes from species of the genus Commiphora, which are native to northeast Africa and the adjacent areas of the Arabian Peninsula. Commiphora myrrha, a tree commonly used in the production of myrrh, can be found in the shallow, rocky soils of Ethiopia, Kenya, Oman, Saudi Arabia and Somalia. It boasts spiny branches with sparse leaves that grow in groups of three, and can reach a height of 9 feet (3 meters). To obtain the Frankincense, a deep, longitudinal incision is made in the trunk of the tree and below it a narrow strip of bark 5 inches in length is peeled off. When the milk-like juice which exudes has hardened by exposure to the air, the incision is deepened. In about three months the resin has attained the required degree of consistency, hardening into yellowish 'tears.' The large, clear globules are scraped off into baskets and the inferior quality that has run down the tree is collected separately. The season for gathering lasts from May till the middle of September, when the first shower of rain puts a close to the gathering for that year. Typical Preparations - Powdered resin added to water, tincture, and very rarely as a tea. For internal use, sometimes mixed with myrrh or cress. In aromatherapy, frankincense is compatible with bergamot, cinnamon, clary sage, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, myrrh, neroli, orange, patchouli, pine, rose, sandalwood, tangerine, and ylang ylang. In Ayurvedic medicine, frankincense is combined with turmeric to make teas, tinctures, or encapsulations for muscle pain and joint pain relief. Resin Burning Guide:Use cup, bowl or incense burner deep enough to fill with earth or sand. Light charcoal on bottom edge until coal begins to ignite, sit charcoal on earth or sand within burner. Let sit for a brief period; until the coal has started to glow, then place resins or powder on charcoal. These coals will burn for an hour or so. Continue to place resins or powder on charcoal as they burn out and smoke decreases for a continuous burning. Once charcoal is lit, it should burn out thoroughly for the full period of time; it can not be extinguished and re-lit at another time.","published_at":"2018-06-18T12:27:24-04:00","created_at":"2018-06-18T12:27:24-04:00","vendor":"vendor-unknown","type":"All","tags":[],"price":1199,"price_min":1199,"price_max":2899,"available":true,"price_varies":true,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":10708906639475,"title":"16 oz.","option1":"16 oz.","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"0-01","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":{"id":3419897856115,"product_id":1010615648371,"position":1,"created_at":"2018-06-18T12:27:25-04:00","updated_at":"2018-06-18T12:27:25-04:00","alt":"Frankincense Resin- Wild Harvested","width":450,"height":240,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/2788aba84ce6f8f0d77206f2d5566aac.jpg?v=1529339245","variant_ids":[10708906639475,10708906672243]},"available":true,"name":"Frankincense Resin- Wild Harvested - 16 oz.","public_title":"16 oz.","options":["16 oz."],"price":2899,"weight":544,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""},{"id":10708906672243,"title":"4 oz.","option1":"4 oz.","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"0-02","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":{"id":3419897856115,"product_id":1010615648371,"position":1,"created_at":"2018-06-18T12:27:25-04:00","updated_at":"2018-06-18T12:27:25-04:00","alt":"Frankincense Resin- Wild Harvested","width":450,"height":240,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/2788aba84ce6f8f0d77206f2d5566aac.jpg?v=1529339245","variant_ids":[10708906639475,10708906672243]},"available":true,"name":"Frankincense Resin- Wild Harvested - 4 oz.","public_title":"4 oz.","options":["4 oz."],"price":1199,"weight":136,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/2788aba84ce6f8f0d77206f2d5566aac.jpg?v=1529339245"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/2788aba84ce6f8f0d77206f2d5566aac.jpg?v=1529339245","options":["Size"],"content":" Derived from tree sap, or gum resin, both frankincense and myrrh are prized for their alluring fragrance. Frankincense is a milky white resin extracted from species of the genus Boswellia, which thrive in arid, cool areas of the Arabian Peninsula, East Africa and India. The finest and most aromatic of this species is Boswellia sacra, a small tree that grows in Somalia, Oman and Yemen. These plants, which grow to a height of 16 feet (5 meters), have papery bark, sparse bunches of paired leaves, and flowers with white petals and a yellow or red center. Myrrh is a reddish resin that comes from species of the genus Commiphora, which are native to northeast Africa and the adjacent areas of the Arabian Peninsula. Commiphora myrrha, a tree commonly used in the production of myrrh, can be found in the shallow, rocky soils of Ethiopia, Kenya, Oman, Saudi Arabia and Somalia. It boasts spiny branches with sparse leaves that grow in groups of three, and can reach a height of 9 feet (3 meters). To obtain the Frankincense, a deep, longitudinal incision is made in the trunk of the tree and below it a narrow strip of bark 5 inches in length is peeled off. When the milk-like juice which exudes has hardened by exposure to the air, the incision is deepened. In about three months the resin has attained the required degree of consistency, hardening into yellowish 'tears.' The large, clear globules are scraped off into baskets and the inferior quality that has run down the tree is collected separately. The season for gathering lasts from May till the middle of September, when the first shower of rain puts a close to the gathering for that year. Typical Preparations - Powdered resin added to water, tincture, and very rarely as a tea. For internal use, sometimes mixed with myrrh or cress. In aromatherapy, frankincense is compatible with bergamot, cinnamon, clary sage, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, myrrh, neroli, orange, patchouli, pine, rose, sandalwood, tangerine, and ylang ylang. In Ayurvedic medicine, frankincense is combined with turmeric to make teas, tinctures, or encapsulations for muscle pain and joint pain relief. Resin Burning Guide:Use cup, bowl or incense burner deep enough to fill with earth or sand. Light charcoal on bottom edge until coal begins to ignite, sit charcoal on earth or sand within burner. Let sit for a brief period; until the coal has started to glow, then place resins or powder on charcoal. These coals will burn for an hour or so. Continue to place resins or powder on charcoal as they burn out and smoke decreases for a continuous burning. Once charcoal is lit, it should burn out thoroughly for the full period of time; it can not be extinguished and re-lit at another time."}

Frankincense Resin- Wild Harvested

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Derived from tree sap, or gum resin, both frankincense and myrrh are prized for their alluring fragrance. Frankincense is a milky white resin extracted from species of the genus Boswellia, which thrive in arid, cool areas of the Arabian Peninsula, East Africa and India. The finest and most aromatic of this species is Boswellia sacra, a small tree that grows in Somalia, Oman and Yemen. These plants, which grow to a height of 16 feet (5 meters), have papery bark, sparse bunches of paired leaves, and flowers with white petals and a yellow or red center. Myrrh is a reddish resin that comes from species of the genus Commiphora, which are native to northeast Africa and the adjacent areas of the Arabian Peninsula. Commiphora myrrha, a tree commonly used in the production of myrrh, can be found in the shallow, rocky soils of Ethiopia, Kenya, Oman, Saudi Arabia and Somalia. It boasts spiny branches with sparse leaves that grow in groups of three, and can reach a height of 9 feet (3 meters). To obtain the Frankincense, a deep, longitudinal incision is made in the trunk of the tree and below it a narrow strip of bark 5 inches in length is peeled off. When the milk-like juice which exudes has hardened by exposure to the air, the incision is deepened. In about three months the resin has attained the required degree of consistency, hardening into yellowish 'tears.' The large, clear globules are scraped off into baskets and the inferior quality that has run down the tree is collected separately. The season for gathering lasts from May till the middle of September, when the first shower of rain puts a close to the gathering for that year. Typical Preparations - Powdered resin added to water, tincture, and very rarely as a tea. For internal use, sometimes mixed with myrrh or cress. In aromatherapy, frankincense is compatible with bergamot, cinnamon, clary sage, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, myrrh, neroli, orange, patchouli, pine, rose, sandalwood, tangerine, and ylang ylang. In Ayurvedic medicine, frankincense is combined with turmeric to make teas, tinctures, or encapsulations for muscle pain and joint pain relief. Resin Burning Guide:Use cup, bowl or incense burner deep enough to fill with earth or sand. Light charcoal on bottom edge until coal begins to ignite, sit charcoal on earth or sand within burner. Let sit for a brief period; until the coal has started to glow, then place resins or powder on charcoal. These coals will burn for an hour or so. Continue to place resins or powder on charcoal as they burn out and smoke decreases for a continuous burning. Once charcoal is lit, it should burn out thoroughly for the full period of time; it can not be extinguished and re-lit at another time.