{"id":1010549686387,"title":"Yerba Santa - Wildharvested","handle":"yerba-santa-wildharvested","description":"The yerba santa plant is an evergreen aromatic shrub with woody rhizomes. It is indigenous to the hills and mountains of California, Oregon, and northern Mexico and is often cultivated as an ornamental shrub. The plant grows to 2.5 meters in height at elevations exceeding 1219 meters. The hairy, lance-shaped leaves are glutinous, and its flowers are white to lavender in color. Also known as E. glutinosum Benth. and Wigandia californicum Hook. \u0026amp; Arn.Asthma - Dry, grind and smoke leaves for asthma and colds.Yerba Santa Tea - Colds, Coughs and Sore ThroatsTEA - Tear 3 leaves (fresh or dry) and place into a cup with boiling water for colds or sore throat. Let steep for 15 minutes.[6] Used by Miwok, Pomo, Yuki, Yurok, Kawaiisu, Karok and Atsugewi tribes, most commonly as a tea, but the fresh leaves were also chewed.[16] Western physicians listed it as an official remedy for coughs, pneumonia and bronchitis in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1894.EXTRACT - Grind 10 leaves per cup of alcohol and add to a mason jar. Shake twice daily and let steep for at least 1 month. Strain into dropper bottles, and take 1 dropperful, 3 times daily as needed.Yerba Santa Tincture - SYRUP Boil leaves, let steep for 15 minutes, strain, and add 2 parts honey to 1 part tea.Decongestant - Cover 3 – 5 leaves (fresh or dry) in a cup with boiling water and let steep for 15 minutes to reduce mucous.[6] Used by Miwok, Pomo and Yuki tribes and by doctors who listed it as an official remedy in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1894.[5,10]Poison Oak - Make a tea for external use, with 5 leaves per cup of water. Rinse infected areas immediately and apply as needed.Rheumatism, Sore Muscles, Joint Inflammation - Steep 5 young leaves in hot water, soak a washcloth as a compress and apply to area of pain.Strength - Chew leaves to moisten mouth and drink tea to purify blood.[4]Wounds - Mash leaves and apply to cuts and wounds to reduce swelling and relieve pain.Indigenous Use - All three groups (Maidu, Konkow and Nisenan) used Yerba Santa for colds and bad coughs. The Konkow boiled the leaves and drank the tea. The Nisenan heated Yerba Santa and then inhaled the steam for colds and dizziness.","published_at":"2018-06-18T12:15:39-04:00","created_at":"2018-06-18T12:15:40-04:00","vendor":"vendor-unknown","type":"All","tags":[],"price":999,"price_min":999,"price_max":2799,"available":true,"price_varies":true,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":10708274020467,"title":"4 oz. (1\/4 lb.)","option1":"4 oz. 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(1 lb.)"],"price":2799,"weight":272,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_management":null,"barcode":""}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/02a01ebb15ab667a2ffae302435213a3.jpg?v=1529338540"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0057\/2617\/5347\/products\/02a01ebb15ab667a2ffae302435213a3.jpg?v=1529338540","options":["Size"],"content":"The yerba santa plant is an evergreen aromatic shrub with woody rhizomes. It is indigenous to the hills and mountains of California, Oregon, and northern Mexico and is often cultivated as an ornamental shrub. The plant grows to 2.5 meters in height at elevations exceeding 1219 meters. The hairy, lance-shaped leaves are glutinous, and its flowers are white to lavender in color. Also known as E. glutinosum Benth. and Wigandia californicum Hook. \u0026amp; Arn.Asthma - Dry, grind and smoke leaves for asthma and colds.Yerba Santa Tea - Colds, Coughs and Sore ThroatsTEA - Tear 3 leaves (fresh or dry) and place into a cup with boiling water for colds or sore throat. Let steep for 15 minutes.[6] Used by Miwok, Pomo, Yuki, Yurok, Kawaiisu, Karok and Atsugewi tribes, most commonly as a tea, but the fresh leaves were also chewed.[16] Western physicians listed it as an official remedy for coughs, pneumonia and bronchitis in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1894.EXTRACT - Grind 10 leaves per cup of alcohol and add to a mason jar. Shake twice daily and let steep for at least 1 month. Strain into dropper bottles, and take 1 dropperful, 3 times daily as needed.Yerba Santa Tincture - SYRUP Boil leaves, let steep for 15 minutes, strain, and add 2 parts honey to 1 part tea.Decongestant - Cover 3 – 5 leaves (fresh or dry) in a cup with boiling water and let steep for 15 minutes to reduce mucous.[6] Used by Miwok, Pomo and Yuki tribes and by doctors who listed it as an official remedy in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1894.[5,10]Poison Oak - Make a tea for external use, with 5 leaves per cup of water. Rinse infected areas immediately and apply as needed.Rheumatism, Sore Muscles, Joint Inflammation - Steep 5 young leaves in hot water, soak a washcloth as a compress and apply to area of pain.Strength - Chew leaves to moisten mouth and drink tea to purify blood.[4]Wounds - Mash leaves and apply to cuts and wounds to reduce swelling and relieve pain.Indigenous Use - All three groups (Maidu, Konkow and Nisenan) used Yerba Santa for colds and bad coughs. The Konkow boiled the leaves and drank the tea. The Nisenan heated Yerba Santa and then inhaled the steam for colds and dizziness."}

Yerba Santa - Wildharvested

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The yerba santa plant is an evergreen aromatic shrub with woody rhizomes. It is indigenous to the hills and mountains of California, Oregon, and northern Mexico and is often cultivated as an ornamental shrub. The plant grows to 2.5 meters in height at elevations exceeding 1219 meters. The hairy, lance-shaped leaves are glutinous, and its flowers are white to lavender in color. Also known as E. glutinosum Benth. and Wigandia californicum Hook. & Arn.Asthma - Dry, grind and smoke leaves for asthma and colds.Yerba Santa Tea - Colds, Coughs and Sore ThroatsTEA - Tear 3 leaves (fresh or dry) and place into a cup with boiling water for colds or sore throat. Let steep for 15 minutes.[6] Used by Miwok, Pomo, Yuki, Yurok, Kawaiisu, Karok and Atsugewi tribes, most commonly as a tea, but the fresh leaves were also chewed.[16] Western physicians listed it as an official remedy for coughs, pneumonia and bronchitis in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1894.EXTRACT - Grind 10 leaves per cup of alcohol and add to a mason jar. Shake twice daily and let steep for at least 1 month. Strain into dropper bottles, and take 1 dropperful, 3 times daily as needed.Yerba Santa Tincture - SYRUP Boil leaves, let steep for 15 minutes, strain, and add 2 parts honey to 1 part tea.Decongestant - Cover 3 – 5 leaves (fresh or dry) in a cup with boiling water and let steep for 15 minutes to reduce mucous.[6] Used by Miwok, Pomo and Yuki tribes and by doctors who listed it as an official remedy in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1894.[5,10]Poison Oak - Make a tea for external use, with 5 leaves per cup of water. Rinse infected areas immediately and apply as needed.Rheumatism, Sore Muscles, Joint Inflammation - Steep 5 young leaves in hot water, soak a washcloth as a compress and apply to area of pain.Strength - Chew leaves to moisten mouth and drink tea to purify blood.[4]Wounds - Mash leaves and apply to cuts and wounds to reduce swelling and relieve pain.Indigenous Use - All three groups (Maidu, Konkow and Nisenan) used Yerba Santa for colds and bad coughs. The Konkow boiled the leaves and drank the tea. The Nisenan heated Yerba Santa and then inhaled the steam for colds and dizziness.